Tooke stallion - Prince. Tooke Family Collection.
Feek Tooke with King Larrygo. Tooke Family Collection.
Gray Wolf. Tooke Family Collection.

FEEK TOOKE

Born April 12, 1909, in Redfield, South Dakota, Chandler Earl "Feek" Tooke was the eldest of six boys born to Earl and Bessie Tooke.  The family moved to Montana in 1913, settling 13 miles west of Ekalaka.

One of Feek's aunts didn't care for the name Chandler, and called him Felix instead. Chandler's brother, Fay, had trouble pronouncing Felix.  It came out "Feek", and became Chandler's moniker for his entire life.

Feek attended school through the 8th grade, after which he worked full time on his father's homestead.  A true horseman, Feek felt that any work worth doing should be done with a horse.  He bought, sold and traded horses, breaking them to ride and for work. 

A keen interest in rodeo led to the building of an arena on the Tooke ranch. The first of many Tooke ranch rodeos was held on Memorial Day in 1931. 

Feek, along with his brothers, gathered a string of bucking horses to produce rodeos in Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota.  They leased bucking horses to producers across the United States.

At the time, wild horses were the main resource for bucking stock. Feek foresaw an end to that supply, and developed the idea to start a breeding program, with horses bred specifically to buck.  Most were skeptical. But Feek set out to turn his vision into reality...and to this day, rodeo is replete with horses carrying champion level Tooke bloodlines. 

Feek's Vision, a documentary by Ken Howie, will tell this story - so important in the history of rodeo - through the experiences and recollections of rodeo champions, stock contractors and those closest to Feek Tooke.  

FEEK'S VISION

KEN HOWIE STUDIOS PRESENTS

IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE CARTER COUNTY MUSEUM & THE FEEK TOOKE FAMILY

DIRECTED BY KEN HOWIE   MUSIC BY MAX CARL

HISTORICAL RESEARCH - FAMILY CONSULTANT TOBY TOOKE

PRODUCER TESS HOWIE

COMING 2019

© 2017 Ken Howie Studios

Copyright notice: All non-historic  images and video copyright Ken Howie. Historic images and video are property of the Tooke family.

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